January 22, 2013

MIT Football Adds Jack Curran to Roster

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. – MIT football grew by one today as the team announced its newest member of the Engineer football family, Jack Curran. Jack, a six-year old from Kingston, Mass., was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in June 2011 and comes to the Engineers through the Team IMPACT program.

"We are thrilled to have Jack be a part of our team," said MIT Head Coach Chad Martinovich. "Our players and coaching staff are all looking forward to Jack being an Engineer. He has already generated a lot of excitement and enthusiasm around our program."

Jack, his parents, Jen and Brett, and his brother Liam, met his new MIT teammates at his official "signing" as the newest Engineer on Tuesday afternoon. During the ceremony Jack was presented with his new MIT jersey that officially made him an Engineer.

Part of the draft process included the MIT players and coaching staff learning about Jack's fight with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, the most common form of leukemia found in children. With his diagnosis, Jack began his treatment regimen with a six-week inpatient stay at Children's Hospital. He is now in remission and will spend the next year and a half receiving weekly chemotherapy to ensure he stays in remission. In addition, Jack also is on a steroid regiment and has regular tests at Dana-Farber to check in on his progress.

According to Jack, his favorite number is 100 and his favorite singer is Michael Jackson.  Jack also lists chicken nuggets as his favorite food, green as his favorite color, and Tom Brady as his favorite athlete.  On TV he likes to watch the 'Regular Show' on the Cartoon Network and Mordecai (a character on the show) is his favorite cartoon character.

Team IMPACT is a non-profit organization created to improve the quality of life for children facing life-threatening illnesses. Across the northeast, Team IMPACT creates unparalleled team based support systems. The organization strives to harness the power of teamwork by matching courageous kids with college athletic teams. Children are drafted by local teams and become official members for the duration of their treatment and beyond.